Through the eyes of the Cloud Machine

Through the eyes of the Cloud Machine

We had the pleasure of working with artist Karolina Sobecka at South First Fridays this month when she showcased Cloud Machines. The ZERO1 Garage was transformed into the Cloud Lab where the public examined the Cloud Machine and the Cloud Collector weather balloons, as well as learn more about cloud formation and geo-engineering. Over 500 people came through the ZERO1 Garage that night and not only got to see the physical components of Sobecka’s Cloud Machine, Cloud Collector, as well as video documentation of them in action, but many visitors were able to engage directly with Sobecka. The following morning, many of us gathered at Pentencia Creek Park for the official launch of the Cloud Machine. Originally Sobecka had planned on launching both the Cloud Machine and the Cloud Collector, but it was a gorgeous day in San Jose with not a cloud in the sky, so the Cloud Collector was sadly grounded. Nevertheless, the launch went off without any issues and reached 55,000ft before bursting and making its way back to land. The trajectory prediction from the night before the launch was fairly close as the payload ended up landing in Livermore. Through her documentation you can follow each step of this journey, so take a moment to watch the video below and visit Sobecka’s website to see step by step images of the launch and retrieval of the Cloud Machine. If you look closely you'll also see a few of the ZERO1 staff as they help 'make a cloud.' Although it turned out the air was too dry that day to create a cloud, a rainbow was created instead. Can you spot it in the video? 

San Jose Cloud Launch from amateurhuman on Vimeo.

 

Cloud Machines was part of our 2013 summer program BRING IT! presented with support of the John S. and James L. Knight Foundation. To learn more about our ongoing programs in the ZERO1 Garage and to find out how you can support programs like these visit www.zero1.org.